Jobs

We are hiring four graduate students for Summer 2019 and two undergraduate students.

Assistant Instructors

We are hiring undergraduate assistant instructors to help with the courses. This is an hourly position for 5 weeks at 40 hours per week, for up to $2400. This includes a week of training and time to learn the material and prepare lesson plans May 20-June 7.

Job description

Assistant instructors will work with instructors to develop lesson plans and lead classroom activities. In addition to classroom duties, assistant instructors are expected to spend the three weeks before camp learning the background mathematics and working with instructors to create a course plan.

Assistant instructors will work together to review lesson plans and learn the material before staff orientation and training begins May 20.

Qualifications

Assistant instructors must have participated in one math Merit course at the University of Illinois. Applicants must be enthusiastic, personable, and dependable. Experience teaching or tutoring is helpful, as is experience with similar academic enrichment programs, either as staff or as a participant. Applicants must possess a genuine interest in encouraging students to study math beyond the high school level, exhibit maturity and a positive attitude, and be willing to serve as a role model for students. 

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Full job description

Priority is given to those who apply by March 25, although we continue evaluating applications until the positions are filled. You can apply here.

Campers working on a math activity in groups.Instructor

Instructors will teach a course that will meet for four days during one week of SIM Camp. They are welcome to choose from the list of past topics:

  • Making and breaking codes (8th and 9th grade)
  • Topological games (8th and 9th grade)
  • Tropical geometry (8th and 9th grade)
  • Beyond 1,2,3 (8th and 9th grade)
  • Number theory and cryptology (9th-12th grade)
  • When straight lines curve (9th-12th grade)
  • BioMath (9th-12th grade)

Instructors will also provide assistant instructors with materials and homework to give them the necessary mathematical background. Additionally, assistant instructors should be incorporated into the lesson planning and teaching process.

We are looking for one instructor to teach SIM Camp Epsilon (rising 8th and 9th grade) and SIM Camp Delta (rising 9th through 12th grade).

We are looking for one instructor to teach SIM Camp Epsilon (rising 8th and 9th grade) and and serve as program coordinator for SIM Camp Delta.

We are looking for one instructor to teach SIM Camp Delta (rising 9th through 12th grade) and and serve as program coordinator for SIM Camp Epsilon.

Qualifications

Instructors must be graduate students in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Applicants must be enthusiastic, personable, and dependable. Experience teaching or tutoring is required. Experience with similar academic enrichment programs, either as staff or as a participant, is helpful, as is experience working with middle or high school students. Applicants must possess an interest in encouraging students to study math beyond the high school level, exhibit maturity and a positive attitude, and be willing to serve as a role model for students.

More information

Full job description

Priority is given to those who apply by March 1, though we will continue accepting applications until positions are full. You can apply here .

Course descriptions

Not your childhood tic-tac-toe: Low dimensional topology and games. Students will explore possible shapes of a two dimensional universe, with a strong focus on the topology of the torus, sphere, and Klein bottle. We will play connect four on a cylinder, tic-tac-toe on the torus, and hide-and-seek on the non-oriented Klein bottle. Students will discover the theory of games, asking questions like “how many first moves are there in torus tic-tac-toe?” or “does the ‘it’ player have an unfair advantage in Klein bottle hide-and-seek?”

Making and breaking codes: Cryptography. Students will learn how to write and read secret messages using modular arithmetic or ``clock math".  We will practice sending each other messages with each method, as well as answer questions like “how can you read a message without knowing the code?” and “how can you share a code without other people being able to read the message?”

Beyond 1,2,3: How Mathematicians Count. Students will explore how mathematicians count and compare different groups of objects. We will learn concepts such as the multiplication principle, combinations, and bijections.  Students will answer questions such as “How many five digit numbers with distinct digits are there?” and “What is my chance of winning the lottery?”

Tropical Geometry. Students will learn how to do arithmetic in the tropical math setting, that is, with the maximum and addition operations. The students will be able to determine which properties, like commutativity, associativity or existence of inverses are shared between the tropical and the classical setting. By the end of the week, students will be able to construct linear tropical curves in the plane.

Number theory and cryptology. Number theory is a broad subject that looks at why natural numbers behave the way they do. Many ancient societies used math that is now considered number theory to find the side lengths of right triangles. Despite the seeming simplicity of the natural numbers, this is still an area of active research. SIM Camp students will look at some basic properties of prime numbers and how they can be used to encrypt messages. This is a high school version of the cryptology course.

When a straight line curves: The geometries of space. Students will explore questions such as, “What happens when the angles of a triangle no longer sum to 180 degrees?” or “what does it mean to be a straight line?”. Students will imagine living in hyperbolic or spherical space, discovering for themselves the challenges presented by these unfamiliar geometries. By the end of the week, we will understand tilings and students will create their own hyperbolic and spherical art to take home.

Mathematical Biology. From diseases to biological networks, we can use mathematics
to create “models” to describe how systems behave over time. Mathematical Biology focuses on translating “real life” problems into mathematical structures we can analyze. Students will explore questions such as “How can you construct a model?”, “What makes a model accurate?” and “Can we apply it to different situations?” We will provide an overview of common types of models used in disciplines such as biology and social sciences. Students will learn how to represent and analyze these using equations, graphs, and computer software. 


Program Coordinator

This position is split with the instructor position.

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Applications are due March 1. You can apply here . This is the same application as the instructor position.

Director

The director will be in charge of coordinating parents, staff, and university/department policies. This includes answering parent emails, ordering supplies and organizing, reserving rooms, staff training, dealing with any interpersonal issues that arise, reviewing lesson plans, coordinating budgets with the business office, ect. If you are interested in the director position, please email math-simcamp@illinois.edu by Friday, February 22.

Qualifications

The director must be a graduate student in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Since some of the duties will begin before the end of the semester, they must be eligible to work grad hourly on top of their existing appointment, Applicants must be enthusiastic, personable, and dependable. Experience organizing events or managing employees is preferred. Experience with similar academic enrichment programs, either as staff or as a participant, is helpful, as is experience working with middle or high school students. Applicants must possess an interest in encouraging students to study math beyond the high school level, exhibit maturity and a positive attitude, and be willing to serve as a role model for students.

More information

Full job description

Instructor and campers

 

 

 

SPONSORS

Support is provided by:

Please consider donating to the Mathematics Department of Mathematics Outreach fund, which supports our Summer Illinois Math camp and other outreach initiatives. Your support helps our department fulfill Illinois’s land grant mission.

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number DMS-1449269.

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